Telehealth

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TTA’s Week: AliveCor’s ECG cleared, Harris acquires Uniphy, CVS and Aetna’s days in court, Jawbone’s resurrection, events, funding and more!

http://telecareaware.com/ttas-week-alivecors-ecg-cleared-harris-acquires-uniphy-cvs-and-aetnas-days-in-court-jawbones-resurrection-events-funding-and-more/

 

 

CVS and Aetna await their hearing on how their merger isn’t anti-competitive, but others ‘spring’ ahead with acquisitions, fresh funding, FDA clearances, and interesting events. And Jawbone makes the case for resurrection.

Next Wednesday is the The King’s Fund’s Digital Health and Care Congress in London. It’s not too late to attend. Plus 10% off registration for our Readers!

News, events roundup: FDA clears AliveCor’s first 6 lead ECG, Jawbone Health rises from ashes, Let’s Get Checked’s $30M check, Health Wildcatters’ $35M ‘how to’ breakfast
CVS-Aetna hearing starts June 4; now only 6 witnesses called, for and against (updated) (The drama continues for the 9th month)
Harris Healthcare acquires in-hospital workflow tech pioneer Uniphy Health (A NJ innovation success bringing better communications to hospitals)
Events, dear friends, events in London from painting to leadership (From Arts in Health to HealthChats and The King’s Fund in summer)

Psychiatry goes ‘hybrid’, health tech gets NICE, events both coming up and future, and in long-running shows, CVS-Aetna and Theranos keep packing them in.

Telepsychiatry improves time to care plus frequency of care for behavioral health patients: study (Now it’s hybrid psychiatry)
CVS-Aetna hearing now June; 12 witnesses called, for and against (Another long-running DC show in its ninth month)
It’s NICE to HealthTech Connect with the NHS (A health tech matchmaking service)
The Theranos Story, ch. 60: becoming a Cautionary Tale of Silicon Valley Ethics (Will SV change its ways? Not likely.)
Events coming up soon–and in the autumn: Hunter College 13 May, Aging 2.0 London 21 May; NYeC’s November Gala, Connected Health Summit (16-18 Oct) poster call

International digital health news from India, Finland, Hong Kong, and even the US leads our roundup, from Verily, Oxford VR, Blackberry, Blue Cedar, and more. And if you are in digital health in the UK, it’s countdown to the Digital Health and Care Congress.

International news roundup: Verily ‘eyes’ India, Oxford VR trials in Hong Kong, Israel-Finland collaborate, Blue Cedar-Blackberry partner, NuvoAir inhales $3M
The King’s Fund Digital Health and Care Congress arrives soon on 22-23 May (It’s here before you know it)

It’s really Spring this week. Theranos lives again, courtesy of the Patent Office, while reliving its demise is postponed in court. Machine learning is starting to shine on radiology. New event at RSM and a major EU prize. But it feels like autumn for Athenahealth, Watson Health, and Waystar.

Comings and goings: Cuts hit Athenahealth, IBM Watson’s Drug Discovery unit; Bain may sell Waystar RCM (Mostly goings)
The Theranos Story, ch. 59: there’s life left in the corporate corpse–patents! And no trial date in sight. (A kind of resurrection, courtesy of the USPTO)
AI and machine learning ‘will transform clinical imaging practice over the next decade’ (Radiology catching up)
Digital Technologies for Disease Prevention and Promotion of Wellbeing – RSM, London, 10th June 2019 (A don’t miss event)
Win the Trillium II prize and get €1,000! (For publicizing and deploying the International Patient Summary)

Spring Fever continues as we hop like a bunny to Easter and Passover. This week has a distinctly international focus, with Babylon Health and Merck in Africa, a digital health funding competition in Helsinki, and Israel’s Tyto Care DTC-ing with Best Buy. We take a critical look at China’s massive data reaping through private healthcare companies for AI diagnostics, with little regard to patient consent or privacy. Closer to home, there’s ATA, Spry Health’s wearable for COPD, and NHSX’s establishment.

International news roundup: ATA dispatches, compete for funding in Helsinki, Spry FDA-cleared for COPD, Merck acquires ConnectMed Kenya 
Babylon Health’s expansion plans in Asia-Pacific, Africa spotlighted (We extract the highlights including the new NHSX for good measure)
Tyto Care inks deal with Best Buy for retail sales of remote diagnostic device (Tyto finally moves into DTC with a retailer apparently set on digital health)
China’s getting set to be the healthcare AI leader–on the backs of sick, rural citizens’ data privacy (Damn ethics and privacy rights, full speed ahead!)

With a touch of spring fever, we round up events from a two-week digital health festival in Leeds to ATA in New Orleans. CVS-Aetna’s merger continues to linger in a Federal court. And the NHS App report is overall positive for its rollout later this year–but Microsoft’s HealthVault is rolling into history.

NHS App’s pilot results: renewing prescriptions good, making appointments…not so much (Plus the demise of Microsoft HealthVault)
Leeds Digital Festival 2019: a two-week showcase of digital health and care (Quite an annual show across town!)
Spring is here, so are some events to enjoy–and broaden your horizons (From New York to New Orleans) 
Drawn-out decision on the CVS-Aetna merger held up again in Federal court (Examined up, down, and sideways in a Federal court–since October)

Fortune and Kaiser Health News take down EHRs and the havoc they wreak on doctors and patients. Our weekly news roundup looks at diabetic VR training in Wessex, telemental health in Australia, GreatCall’s health ambitions–and prescribing apps is baaack!

EHRs: The Bridge to Nowhere–other than despair. An investigative Must Read on ‘an unholy mess’. (The reality settles in, and it’s worse than you thought, whether you’re a doctor or patient)
News roundup from all over: prescribing apps is back! Plus telemental health Down Under, GreatCall’s health tech strategy, Wessex’s diabetic sim, telehealth growth outpaces urgent care


The King’s Fund’s annual Digital Health and Care Congress is back on 22-23 May. Secretary Matt Hancock keynoting and closing Day 2. Meet leading NHS and social care professionals and learn how data and technology can improve the health and well-being of patients plus the quality and effectiveness of the services that they use. Our Readers are eligible for a 10% discount using the link in the advert or here, plus the code Telehealth_10.


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

Next DHACA Day 9th July, London – seeking new members (psst–it’s free)

http://telecareaware.com/next-dhaca-day-9th-july-london-seeking-new-members-psst-its-free/

DHACA, the Digital Health and Care Alliance, with some 850 members currently, is having a new membership drive among SMEs working in the UK’s digital health & care space, following the kind offering of new sponsorship by Kent Surrey and Sussex AHSN and UCL Partners. 

The organisation’s objective is to help members develop their innovative products and services commercially, to achieve successful sales to the NHS. DHACA works right across the UK.

If you aren’t a member, you can sign up here to ensure you are kept aware of important news and of DHACA events. Membership is entirely free and members’ details will of course never be passed on to any other organisation.

Whether or not you are currently a member, booking is now open for the next DHACA Day. This event is primarily aimed at informing members working in the digital health & care sector of the major recent changes they need to be aware of, and how best to navigate them to make greater sales to the NHS and other health & care organisations. There is a small charge of £30+VAT to provide lunch, otherwise all other costs will kindly be covered by the event Sponsors, Baker Botts, in whose premises at 41 Lothbury (the opposite side of the Bank of England to the Bank Tube) it will be held.

The draft agenda includes talks by Luke Pratsides, Clinical Lead, Digital Development, NHS England about NHSX, Sam Shah, Director of Digital Development at NHS England and James Maguire, Clinical Advisor in Digital Innovation & AI at NHSX on NHS England’s digital development strategy, Mark Salmon, Programme Director, NICE on their HealthTech Connect and Evidence Standards, Neil Foster, Partner, Baker Botts on Finance for digital health start-ups, Neil Coulson, Partner, Baker Botts, on IP protection and the GDPR, Rob Berry, Commercial Director, UCL Partners on how the AHSNs can help SMEs and much more. Neil McGuire, Clinical Director of Devices, MHRA, has also been invited to update attendees on MDR implementation – a most important topic.

DHACA is keen to get members’ views on how they’d like it to be organised and governed in order to deliver what members want, so there will be time in the middle of the day for this too.

Should be a great day!

(Disclosure: this Editor is also DHACA CEO) 

 

Breaking News–Teladoc: while accredited by NCQA, placed on ‘under corrective action’ status

http://telecareaware.com/breaking-news-teladoc-while-accredited-by-ncqa-placed-on-under-corrective-action-status/

Breaking News. Teladoc–one of the two giants in telemedicine–has been placed on ‘under corrective action’ status in its latest (15 May) two-year accreditation with the National Committee for Quality Assurance, better known by its initials, NCQA. Their next review is slated for six months (18 Nov).

According to the earliest breaking report on Seeking Alpha, a business and stock market website, the move to ‘corrective action’ status has been brewing for some time. Teladoc was the first telemedicine company to win this coveted status in 2013. Now, of course, all major telemedicine players have this accreditation.

This is the latest mark against the company, which has gone through some recent ‘interesting times’ financially with accounting problems based on booking stock awards (2018), the CFO’s resignation, and lack of replacement. The report by a ‘bear’ on the stock indicates that its large contract with Aetna, among others, is up for renewal.

Exactly what this ‘corrective action’ is related to has not been made public by either NCQA or Teladoc. Comments under the article sourced from a Wells Fargo analyst that the action is arising from a workflow that Teladoc uses for credentialing providers.

A good portion of this article discusses revisions on the Teladoc website and marketing materials which ensues when something like this happens and it is the basis for a superiority or credentialing claim.

NCQA is a non-profit that advocates quality standards and measures for healthcare organizations, health plans, and organizations that provide services to the former. Their standards are widespread in the industry as a means of review and accreditation for providers and hospitals, as well as incorporated into quality metrics used by HHS and CMS. For those who may not be able to access the full article–requires free membership (but you’ll get emails) registration with the Seeking Alpha site–attached is a PDF of the article.

Next DHACA Day 9th July, London – seeking new members (psst it’s free)

http://telecareaware.com/next-dhaca-day-9th-july-london-seeking-new-members-psst-its-free/

DHACA, the Digital Health and Care Alliance, with some 850 members currently, is having a new membership drive among SMEs working in the UK’s digital health & care space, following the kind offering of new sponsorship by Kent Surrey and Sussex AHSN and UCL Partners. 

The organisation’s objective is to help members develop their innovative products and services commercially, to achieve successful sales to the NHS. DHACA works right across the UK.

If you aren’t a member, you an sign up here to ensure you are kept aware of important news and of DHACA events. Membership is entirely free and members’ details will of course never be passed on to any other organisation.

Whether or not you are currently a member, booking is now open for the next DHACA Day. This event is primarily aimed at informing members working in the digital health & care sector of the major recent changes they need to be aware of, and how best to navigate them to make greater sales to the NHS and other health & care organisations. There is a small charge of £30+VAT to provide lunch, otherwise all other costs will kindly be covered by the event Sponsors, Baker Botts, in whose premises at 41 Lothbury (the opposite side of the Bank of England to the Bank Tube) it will be held.

The draft agenda includes talks by Luke Pratsides, Clinical Lead, Digital Development, NHS England about NHSX, Sam Shah, Director of Digital Development at NHS England and James Maguire, Clinical Advisor in Digital Innovation & AI at NHSX on NHS England’s digital development strategy, Mark Salmon, Programme Director, NICE on their HealthTech Connect and Evidence Standards, Neil Foster, Partner, Baker Botts on Finance for digital health start-ups, Neil Coulson, Partner, Baker Botts, on IP protection and the GDPR, Rob Berry, Commercial Director, UCL Partners on how the AHSNs can help SMEs and much more. Neil McGuire, Clinical Director of Devices, MHRA, has also been invited to update attendees on MDR implementation – a most important topic.

DHACA is keen to get members’ views on how they’d like it to be organised and governed in order to deliver what members want, so there will be time in the middle of the day for this too.

Should be a great day!

(Disclosure: this Editor is also DHACA CEO) 

 

CVS-Aetna hearing starts June 4; now only 6 witnesses called, for and against (updated)

http://telecareaware.com/cvs-aetna-hearing-now-june-12-witnesses-called-for-and-against/

The next chapter of the ‘Perils of Pauline’ saga that is the CVS-Aetna merger won’t commence until June, as it turns out, but already the amici curiae are piling up on both sides. Judge Richard Leon of the US District Court for the District of Columbia has been lining up the witnesses he’ll be hearing from, both for and against. 

On the ‘anti’ side, testifying that the settlement agreement would be anti-competitive and not in the best interest of consumers, the American Medical Association (AMA) had called in three professors, the AIDS Healthcare Foundation three, and Consumer Action and the US Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) one. On the ‘pro’ side, put forward by CVS and for the Department of Justice, are five witnesses, healthcare executives and government consultants, who will testify that actions taken by CVS and DOJ will preserve competition and benefit consumers.

Certainly as we clock the ninth month after DOJ approved the merger and the companies have closed the deal, the drama continues, as Judge Leon continues to get coverage and the merger continues to be held up in this highly unusual proceeding. HealthLeaders 22 April and 7 May.

Update 13 May. The DOJ is challenging the three AMA witnesses, saying that they will be broadening the hearing beyond the settlement agreement which is what the review by Judge Leon is supposed to be about. On the other hand, the judge has already stated that the settlement covers “about one-tenth of 1%” of the merger, so he is already staking out a much larger territory. The AMA, of course, is quite pleased with the opportunity. Is this hearing pushing the envelope of judicial overreach in this judge’s interpretation of what a District Court can do under the Tunney Act? We can only wait and see. Healthcare Dive 13 May. Our coverage of the hearing to date here.  

Update 14 May. DOJ of course lost its fight with Judge Leon to limit the scope of the hearing and the AMA witness testimony, with the judge stating it is “essential” to understand how PBM affects Medicare Part D drug plans, though Aetna divested itself of the latter at DOJ’s direction. Both sides have three approved witnesses each for the three-day hearing. The ‘antis’ are Neeraj Sood (AMA), Diana Moss (Consumer Action/PIRG) and Michael Wohlfeiler (AIDS Healthcare foundation). The ‘pros’ are Alan Lotvin (CVS Health), Terri Swanson (Aetna) and Lawrence Wu (NERA Consulting). Healthcare Dive 14 May

News, events roundup: FDA clears AliveCor’s first 6 lead ECG, Jawbone Health rises from ashes, Let’s Get Checked’s $30M check, Health Wildcatters’ $35M ‘how to’ breakfast

http://telecareaware.com/news-events-roundup-fda-clears-alivecors-first-6-lead-ecg-jawbone-health-rises-from-ashes-lets-get-checkeds-30m-check-health-wildcatters-35m-how-to-breakfast/

AliveCor receives FDA clearance for KardiaMobile 6L, the first FDA-cleared personal 6-lead device. From the AliveCor release, the description: “In addition to the two electrodes on the top of the device, there is one additional electrode on the bottom. The user places her thumbs on each of the two top electrodes, and places the bottom electrode on her left knee or ankle. This formation, known in cardiology as the Einthoven Triangle, allows cardiologists to view electrical activity in the heart from six perspectives or “leads.”” The information is sent to the mobile device’s software including KardiaAI bradycardia and tachycardia detection features cleared recently for the single-lead KardiaBand, as well as deeper information into arrhythmias. The single-lead ECG space that AliveCor pioneered with first their snap-on then the KardiaBand is now crowded with the Apple Watch, Withings, and numerous others. It’s a big step forward for the company. AliveCor has opened pre-orders now at $149, to be delivered starting in June. 9to5Mac, Biospace (release), Mobihealthnews

Save Your Jawbones, the Founder Rises Again. Yes, Jawbone founder Hosain Rahman just raised $64.5 million for a new company. The new outfit, dubbed Jawbone Health, will offer a “personalized subscription service where we take all of this continuous health data about you and we combine that with a lot of machine intelligence . . .” to prevent avoidable diseases. After having burnt to a crisp $1 billion over 10 years on wireless speakers and fitness bands, again Mr. Rahman goes into territory which isn’t exactly unique with the footprints of the aforementioned Apple Watches, Withings, Spry Health’s Loop, EarlySense, etc. But hey,  SignalFire and Refactor Capital in the Bay Area, Polymath Ventures and Meraas in Dubai like his style. Even TechCrunch is arching an eyebrow.

Let’s Get Checked checks in with $30 million raise. This NYC-based direct-to-home supplier and manufacturer of in-home test kits raised a $30 million Series B from Leerink Transformation Partners, Qiming Venture Partners USA, and Optum Ventures after last year’s $10 million Series A. Customers can order in-state physician-approved laboratory tests via LetsGetChecked.com or through partner retailers, including CVS, Walmart, Pharmaca, and McKesson online stores, with delivery in 1-2 days. Tests covering wellness, men’s and women’s health are processed by CLIA-certified reference labs with results sent to a secure online account in 2-5 days, with the customer referred to in-state physicians for interpretation of results and further action if needed. PrivaPath Diagnostics markets in the US, Canada, Ireland, and Europe. Release

Speaking of raising money, how about $35 million for your med device startup? Health Wildcatters is hosting one of their Pulse Health Startup Education Series breakfasts (7.30-9am) in Dallas on Tuesday 21 May with main speaker Ken Nelson from Bardy Diagnostics, which just had a $35.5 million Series B, presumably letting everyone in on the secret. Registration and more information here.

Attention! Florida Updates Telehealth Policy

http://ctel.org/2019/05/attention-florida-updates-telehealth-policy/

Good news on Florida’s telehealth-friendly H.B. 23, which we discussed in an earlier article: As of last week, both chambers of Florida’s legislature have passed the new bill, further (as the National Law Review sums up) “cement[ing] the validity of telehealth services in Florida, establish[ing] new telehealth practice standards, creat[ing] a registration process for out-of-state health care professionals to use telehealth to deliver health care services to Florida patients, and introduce[ing] less-than-ideal commercial reimbursement provisions.” Work began on the bill in early 2017, through the efforts of the state’s telehealth advisory council. After nearly two years of dedicated research, the legislature decided to move forward; now, it is widely anticipated that Governor Ron DeSantis will sign the bill, making it law in the state.

H.B. 23 makes numerous
changes to existing telehealth law in Florida. The bill begins by providing a
definition of telehealth to include asynchronous store-and-forward technology,
though still strictly prohibiting “audio-only telephone calls, e-mail messages,
or fax transmissions.” Providers are expected to use telehealth technology with
the same standard of care practiced in traditional medicine, meaning there has
to be some way to verify the patient. The bill goes on to define a telehealth
provider, which also “includes an individual who obtains an out-of-state
telehealth registration.” Out-of-state health care professionals are allowed to
deliver telehealth services in Florida without a Florida license if they
complete certain steps. This is a huge departure from the previous law. After
defining key terms, the bill lays out practice standards, including when it
comes to prescribing laws. The former law allowed prescription through
telehealth only for psychiatric disorders or for patients in hospitals.
However, the new law expands prescribing to nursing home and hospice patients
as well. Furthermore, physicians are no longer required to physically examine a
patient before using telehealth, another significant change to telemedicine
practice. Lastly, the bill discusses reimbursement and insurance coverage, though
not requiring health care plans to cover telehealth.  

If signed by the governor, the bill
will go into effect in July 2019, with the reimbursement and insurance portion
to take effect January 2020. It may take a bit for the medical board to update
its policies and regulations to reflect the new laws if current policies
conflict, so practitioners will need to navigate Florida health care carefully.
However, it’s undoubtedly a big step forward in what’s already been a banner
year for telehealth legislation across the country. Stay tuned…

Click here to read the National Law Review article on the passage of H.B. 23 in Florida.

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TTA’s Week: hybrid psychiatry shortens care, health tech gets NICE, CVS-Aetna and Theranos still in news, and lots of events!

http://telecareaware.com/ttas-week-hybrid-psychiatry-shortens-care-health-tech-gets-nice-cvs-aetna-and-theranos-still-in-news-and-lots-of-events/

 

Psychiatry goes ‘hybrid’, health tech gets NICE, events both coming up and future, and in long-running shows, CVS-Aetna and Theranos keep packing them in.

And if you are in digital health in the UK, it’s the Next-To-Final Countdown to the Digital Health and Care Congress.

22 May is two weeks away! Scroll below for news of The King’s Fund’s Digital Health and Care Congress in London. Joining the Day 1 plenary are Tara Donnelly and Terence Eden from NHSX, with Matt Hancock as keynote closing speaker on day 2. Plus 10% off registration for our Readers!

Telepsychiatry improves time to care plus frequency of care for behavioral health patients: study (Now it’s hybrid psychiatry)
CVS-Aetna hearing now June; 12 witnesses called, for and against (Another long-running DC show in its ninth month)
It’s NICE to HealthTech Connect with the NHS (A health tech matchmaking service)
The Theranos Story, ch. 60: becoming a Cautionary Tale of Silicon Valley Ethics (Will SV change its ways? Not likely.)
Events coming up soon–and in the autumn: Hunter College 13 May, Aging 2.0 London 21 May; NYeC’s November Gala, Connected Health Summit (16-18 Oct) poster call

International digital health news from India, Finland, Hong Kong, and even the US leads our roundup, from Verily, Oxford VR, Blackberry, Blue Cedar, and more. And if you are in digital health in the UK, it’s countdown to the Digital Health and Care Congress.

International news roundup: Verily ‘eyes’ India, Oxford VR trials in Hong Kong, Israel-Finland collaborate, Blue Cedar-Blackberry partner, NuvoAir inhales $3M
The King’s Fund Digital Health and Care Congress arrives soon on 22-23 May (It’s here before you know it)

It’s really Spring this week. Theranos lives again, courtesy of the Patent Office, while reliving its demise is postponed in court. Machine learning is starting to shine on radiology. New event at RSM and a major EU prize. But it feels like autumn for Athenahealth, Watson Health, and Waystar.

Comings and goings: Cuts hit Athenahealth, IBM Watson’s Drug Discovery unit; Bain may sell Waystar RCM (Mostly goings)
The Theranos Story, ch. 59: there’s life left in the corporate corpse–patents! And no trial date in sight. (A kind of resurrection, courtesy of the USPTO)
AI and machine learning ‘will transform clinical imaging practice over the next decade’ (Radiology catching up)
Digital Technologies for Disease Prevention and Promotion of Wellbeing – RSM, London, 10th June 2019 (A don’t miss event)
Win the Trillium II prize and get €1,000! (For publicizing and deploying the International Patient Summary)

Spring Fever continues as we hop like a bunny to Easter and Passover. This week has a distinctly international focus, with Babylon Health and Merck in Africa, a digital health funding competition in Helsinki, and Israel’s Tyto Care DTC-ing with Best Buy. We take a critical look at China’s massive data reaping through private healthcare companies for AI diagnostics, with little regard to patient consent or privacy. Closer to home, there’s ATA, Spry Health’s wearable for COPD, and NHSX’s establishment.

International news roundup: ATA dispatches, compete for funding in Helsinki, Spry FDA-cleared for COPD, Merck acquires ConnectMed Kenya 
Babylon Health’s expansion plans in Asia-Pacific, Africa spotlighted (We extract the highlights including the new NHSX for good measure)
Tyto Care inks deal with Best Buy for retail sales of remote diagnostic device (Tyto finally moves into DTC with a retailer apparently set on digital health)
China’s getting set to be the healthcare AI leader–on the backs of sick, rural citizens’ data privacy (Damn ethics and privacy rights, full speed ahead!)

With a touch of spring fever, we round up events from a two-week digital health festival in Leeds to ATA in New Orleans. CVS-Aetna’s merger continues to linger in a Federal court. And the NHS App report is overall positive for its rollout later this year–but Microsoft’s HealthVault is rolling into history.

NHS App’s pilot results: renewing prescriptions good, making appointments…not so much (Plus the demise of Microsoft HealthVault)
Leeds Digital Festival 2019: a two-week showcase of digital health and care (Quite an annual show across town!)
Spring is here, so are some events to enjoy–and broaden your horizons (From New York to New Orleans) 
Drawn-out decision on the CVS-Aetna merger held up again in Federal court (Examined up, down, and sideways in a Federal court–since October)

Fortune and Kaiser Health News take down EHRs and the havoc they wreak on doctors and patients. Our weekly news roundup looks at diabetic VR training in Wessex, telemental health in Australia, GreatCall’s health ambitions–and prescribing apps is baaack!

EHRs: The Bridge to Nowhere–other than despair. An investigative Must Read on ‘an unholy mess’. (The reality settles in, and it’s worse than you thought, whether you’re a doctor or patient)
News roundup from all over: prescribing apps is back! Plus telemental health Down Under, GreatCall’s health tech strategy, Wessex’s diabetic sim, telehealth growth outpaces urgent care


The King’s Fund’s annual Digital Health and Care Congress is back on 22-23 May. Secretary Matt Hancock keynoting and closing Day 2. Meet leading NHS and social care professionals and learn how data and technology can improve the health and well-being of patients plus the quality and effectiveness of the services that they use. Our Readers are eligible for a 10% discount using the link in the advert or here, plus the code Telehealth_10.


Have a job to fill? Seeking a position? Free listings available to match our Readers with the right opportunities. Email Editor Donna.


Read Telehealth and Telecare Aware: http://telecareaware.com/  @telecareaware

Follow our pages on LinkedIn and on Facebook

We thank our present and past advertisers and supporters: Tynetec, Eldercare, UK Telehealthcare, NYeC, PCHAlliance, ATA, The King’s Fund, HIMSS, Health 2.0 NYC, MedStartr, Parks Associates, and HealthIMPACT.

Reach international leaders in health tech by advertising your company or event/conference in TTA–contact Donna for more information on how we help and who we reach. See our advert information here. 


Telehealth & Telecare Aware: covering the news on latest developments in telecare, telehealth, telemedicine and health tech, worldwide–thoughtfully and from the view of fellow professionals

Thanks for asking for update emails. Please tell your colleagues about this news service and, if you have relevant information to share with the rest of the world, please let me know.

Donna Cusano, Editor In Chief
donna.cusano@telecareaware.com

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Events, dear friends, events in London from painting to leadership

http://telecareaware.com/events-dear-friends-events-in-london-from-painting-to-leadership/

‘Framing the Future’, Paintings in Hospitals 60th Anniversary. Monday 13 May at 6pm, Royal College of Physicians

What is the past, present and future role of arts in health? Considering the past pioneers and future innovations of visual arts in health and social care is a panel including Edmund de Waal OBE (artist and author), Dr Errol Francis (CEO of Culture&), Dr Val Huet (CEO of the British Association of Art Therapists), Prof. Victoria Tischler (Professor of Arts and Health at the University of West London) and Ed Vaizey MP (Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing). This event is waitlisted, but was fascinating enough to warrant a mention.

HealthChat with Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England, Thursday 23 May at 5.30pm, The King’s Fund

Organized by UK Health Gateway, this evening with Ms. May will delve into issues such as workforce, her priorities, and how she will unite nurses in planning for the future? Tickets through Eventbrite are £19.95 – £39.95.

HealthChat with Rashik Parmar MBE. Monday 10 June at 5.30pm, The King’s Fund

Organized by UK Health Gateway, this evening with Mr. Parmar who is a Fellow of IBM, the leader of IBM’s European technical community and an IBM Distinguished Engineer will be about technology, data mapping, and AI. Tickets through Eventbrite are  £19.95 – £39.95.

Hat tip to Roy Lilley and his NHSManagers.net newsletter for the above three events

Ninth annual leadership and management summit. Wednesday 10 July starting 8am for the full day. The King’s Fund

The King’s Fund’s annual leadership event is for senior leaders in health and care organizations across the public, private and third sectors. Topics will be centered on leadership capabilities and cultures that enable teams to deliver better patient care and value for money, while also delivering continuous improvements to population health. Speakers include the Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP and Simon Stevens, CEO of NHS England. More information and registration here.

 

Telehealth and Workers Comp: The “Last Frontier”?

http://ctel.org/2019/05/telehealth-and-workers-comp-the-last-frontier/

As even casual observers of the industry know by now, telehealth has quickly expanded into almost every area of health care provision, with one significant exception: workers’ compensation. Some are even calling it the “last frontier” for connected care technology. We have seen how telehealth allows people to receive medical attention in the comforts of their own home or other locations that are convenient for them. The same is true for those wishing to use telehealth as a part of their workers’ compensation. As noted in a recent Safety National blog post, “Telemedicine makes it possible for injured employees to reach a qualified clinician from home or the worksite, providing a promising alternative that ensures early treatment.” It can also be a successful way for employers to manage their employees’ health care experiences, which is exactly what the RIMS (The Risk Management Society) 2019 Conference and Exhibition hopes to show.

Though
some states have been quick to adopt telehealth legislation and promote its
use, companies for the most part (despite a gradual growth in the number
offering telehealth benefits to their employees) have not followed so rapidly
in implementing the technologies. Part of the issue revolves around the
differences in laws regarding telehealth use for companies versus individuals.
Billing, reimbursement, and rates are just some of the difference to take into
account when it comes to group health programs and state workers’ compensation.
Furthermore, as the Safety National post explains, “[f]or workers’ compensation
claims, wherever the patient is when they need to see a doctor, that state’s
medical rules will apply, regardless of where the patient lives or where the
accident took place.” The best way to navigate through these differences is to
communicate and develop a plan to facilitate awareness and use. Part of
developing that plan is to decide on an appropriate model. The model chosen
depends the following factors: “use of occupational medical experts/generalists,
phone/video and scope/continuity of care,” technology and equipment needed,
workplace flow, provider experience, and communication.

The
key thing to remember, of course, is that telehealth is not perfect for all
situations. However, “it can be used for minor injury visits, recheck visits,
telerehab, specialty visits (dermatology, behavioral health) and pathogen
exposure counseling/treatment” effectively. Using telehealth in these
situations eliminates the need for unnecessary travel and reduces costs.
Ultimately, it provides employers, many of whom are increasingly choosing to
offer on-site clinics, with another way to offer health care benefits to their
employees on a situation-by-situation basis.

Click here to read the Safety National blog post on the use of telehealth for workers’ compensation.

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